Food

Omelettes

Some of the most common culinary pornography on the web comes in the form of an omelette – and it’s not surprising: Omelettes are one of the most versatile dishes you can make. You’re literally stuffing ingredients into an egg, so the creativity at your disposal is endless.

Each omelette is a personal statement and the sheer variety of ingredients, sizes, and shapes all add up to an omelette that is uniquely your own.With that in mind, we decided to start a series to see how creative we could get, while still ending up with tasty results. Below are three of our favourites, so far.

Spicy Chorizo Omelette

By Mano Kardaras

omelette1

1 small spicy chorizo sausage, thinly sliced
1 small jalapeno pepper, chopped
2 slices haloumi cheese

Heat a frying pan on medium heat and add olive oil. Whisk three eggs and pour into frying pan. Add ingredients and fold omelette after it has cooked a bit. Let sit for another minute and serve.

As the name suggests, this one’s for those that like it spicy. The chorizo and jalapeno definitely give it a kick, but the squeaky haloumi tempers the heat a little bit.

If you’re feeling really adventurous, put some Frank’s Red Hot on that sh!t.

Spanakopita Omelette

By Mano Kardaras

omelette2

1 small loukaniko thinly sliced (Greek sausage)
5-6 spinach leaves
Crumbled feta cheese
Crumbled ricotta cheese
1 tbsp tzatziki

Heat a frying pan on medium heat and add olive oil. Whisk three eggs and pour into frying pan. Add the tzatziki first and use the spoon to lightly spread it on the omelette. Add remaining ingredients and fold omelette after it has cooked a bit. Let sit for another minute and serve.

I went back to my roots on this one and had a lot of fun in the process. Partly inspired by my Spanakopita Grilled Cheese, this omelette is very creamy. The ricotta really melts and gives it a soft texture that’s balanced by the more crispy spinach. The hint of the tzatziki is really what tips the Greekness factor of this omelette.

Not recommended if you care about your breath.

Pasta Omelette (Frittata di Pasta)

By Marco Provenzano

omelette3

I remember my family making frittata di pasta (or just simply a pasta omelette) since I was very young, and I enjoyed it every time. (Pasta and omelettes together?! Who wouldn’t love it?!) This is a classic Italian recipe:

One package of spaghettini (approx 500 grams)
8 eggs
½ cup parmesan cheese
2 cured Italian sausages (sliced)
1 tbsp olive oil
Salt and pepper to taste

Step 1: Cook the pasta as you normally would, drain, and set aside.

Step 2: In a large bowl, whisk together the eggs, parmesan cheese, salt and pepper, as well as the sliced sausages.

Step 3: Add the pasta to the egg mixture and stir until it is fully coated.

Step 4: In a large frying pan, heat the olive oil on medium heat. Once the oil is heated, add enough of the spaghettini and egg mixture to fill the pan about 1 inch high. Flatten the mixture and let it cook until the bottom is golden brown (around 5 minutes, but it should be checked periodically).

Step 5: Once the bottom is golden brown, place a dinner plate on top of the frying pan and flip the frittata (Wow, don’t you look cool doing that!). Slide the frittata back onto the pan, and cook the second side.

Step 6: Once the frittata is cooked, place it on a serving plate, sprinkle with some more parmesan cheese, garnish with a piece of parsley or basil and cut it like a pizza.

Pizza? What a great idea for our next omelette post!


Omelettes offer a very accessible playground. You can turn into a mad scientist coming up with different recipes and ingredients to include. There are very few limitations.

Check the fridge for leftovers, whip out the eggs, and get crackin’! Be sure to share your creations with us. The world’s your omelette!

…That’s my cue to leave.

You Might Also Like